Presents for YOU

“Nothing comes to this earth unless it first passes through a woman.” — Guru Nanak

This is one of my favorite quotes from the Ecstatic Birth Training Sessions, a swift reminder of the powerful and sacred portal that is childbirth.

This Mother’s Day, I’d like to celebrate in style and open up the work I do with expectant moms and with practitioners. I’d like to gift you with some free trainings.

Pick your pleasure- sign up for one or both and please share generously in the spirit of bringing more love and pleasure to all birthing moms and babies entering this planet.

Are you hungry for more pleasure?

Amplify Your Sensuality Consistently, the biggest piece of advice I give women interested in Ecstatic Birth is to connect more deeply to their bodies and their sensuality.. to learn to feeeeeeel more pleasure.. to learn how to tap into that sensual energy at will.

This not only makes your physical experience of birth better, but it makes life in and out of the bedroom way better too.

There was a time long ago when I felt really whiney about my orgasms and then I met Saida Désilets who encouraged me to disconnect from any expectations and focus instead on my connection with myself.

Thus began an eye opening, mind blowing journey into what is possible.

The Missing Link

This year my son received sex ed in his 7th grade health class for the first time. Much to his mortification, I asked him many questions about what he was being taught about the female anatomy. Unfortunately, but not surprising, while boys were taught about ejaculation and how to put on condoms, among other things, the girls only received half the story about their bodies– they learned about ovulation, periods, and pregnancy.

While they did clarify proper usage of vulva vs. vagina, the class did not even begin to name the outer and inner anatomy of the vulva. The word clitoris was never mentioned, much less the vestibular bulbs (pound for pound as much erectile tissues as men) or any conversation about the pleasure centers of the female reproductive systems.

I mentioned this to a fellow mom and she said, “most people would be happy about that.” Ouch.

Birth Practitioners

When I first launched Ecstatic Birth, I wanted to support a woman like I was at the beginning of my journey.

…a woman who wanted to have an incredible birth experience, but didn’t know what that meant or where to begin.

I do attract a lot of these women, but I was always surprised to see so many of you practitioners on my list, in my programs, on my calls.doula-image

Thank you for sharing with me time and time again how much you want to integrate this with your client work. Thank you for helping me see that this was not included in any of your formal trainings, that this is as new and progressive to you as it is to the expectant mamas I work with.

I get it and I also get that if we work together we can support more women in having empowering and pleasurable births.

I want more women to know and learn and open to the possibility of birthing with pleasure, more women than I can work with one on one.

I want to enable you, who are already working with expectant mamas, to share this information, these tools, these resources with them.

Registration is now open for the 2016 Ecstatic Birth Practitioner Training Program!

Rites of Passage

This blog post has been a long time coming. Perhaps when the intensity of a situation is so strong, some time has to pass before you can express your experience clearly in words.

I am a birthkeeper, meaning I hold the sacredness of this rite of passage near and dear to my heart and I do what I can to bring light to the world of childbirth. When the #1 word that comes to mind when women think of birth is “pain,” (way ahead of “baby” btw) there is plenty of light needed.
woman-walking-into-light
The past six months I have spent a lot of time in the presence of the opposite rite of passage, death. The experience of watching a beloved family member get sick, fade and pass before our eyes in a matter of months was heartbreaking on so many levels.

The birthkeeper in me also found it completely fascinating. Why? Because despite the intense sorrow there were many moments that were so profound, so full of love, so real and palpable that the sensation of grief in my body was tinged with something else.

It’s a feeling that I hesitate to call ecstasy because the context is so very different from how I usually talk about ecstasy.

Or is it?

Birth and death are the most pivotal rites of passages that we live as human beings here on this planet, both wrapped in the mysterious essence of our condition. Where do we come from and where do we go?